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Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention on College …

Bklet cvr 2008 color 235 Final 9/26/08 7:48 AM Page 1. model Programs The Department of Education's mission is to promote student achievement and preparation for global competitiveness by fostering educational excellence and ensuring equal ac c e s s . Department of Education Alcohol and Other drug Prevention on College campuses model Programs Department of Education Office of Safe and drug -Free Schools This publication was funded by the Office of Safe and drug -Free Schools at the Depart- ment of Education under contracts number ED-99-CO-0094 and ED-04-CO-0137 with Education Development Center, Inc. The contracting officer's representative was Richard Lucey, Jr.

Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention on College Campuses Model Programs U.S. Department of Education Offi ce of Safe and Drug-Free Schools

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1 Bklet cvr 2008 color 235 Final 9/26/08 7:48 AM Page 1. model Programs The Department of Education's mission is to promote student achievement and preparation for global competitiveness by fostering educational excellence and ensuring equal ac c e s s . Department of Education Alcohol and Other drug Prevention on College campuses model Programs Department of Education Office of Safe and drug -Free Schools This publication was funded by the Office of Safe and drug -Free Schools at the Depart- ment of Education under contracts number ED-99-CO-0094 and ED-04-CO-0137 with Education Development Center, Inc. The contracting officer's representative was Richard Lucey, Jr.

2 The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Department of Education, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the government. This publication also contains hyperlinks and URLs for information created and maintained by private orga- nizations. This information is provided for the reader's convenience. The Department of Education is not responsible for controlling or guaranteeing the accuracy, relevance, timeli- ness, or completeness of this outside information. Further, the inclusion of information or a hyperlink or URL does not reflect the importance of the organization, nor is it intended to endorse any views expressed, or products or services offered.

3 Department of Education Margaret Spellings Secretary Office of Safe and drug -Free Schools Deborah A. Price Assistant Deputy Secretary First printed 2000; updated November 2002 and September 2008. This report is in the public domain. Authorization to reproduce it in whole or in part is granted. While permission to reprint this publication is not necessary, the citation should be: Department of Education, Office of Safe and drug -Free Schools, Alcohol and Other drug Prevention on College campuses : model Programs, Washington, , 2008. To order copies of this report, write to: ED Pubs, Education Publications Center, Department of Education, P.

4 O. Box 1398, Jessup, MD 20794-1398;. or fax your request to: 301-470-1244;. or e-mail your request to: or call in your request toll-free: 1-877-433-7827 (1-877-4-ED-PUBS). If 877. service is not yet available in your area, call 1-800-872-5327 (1-800-USA-LEARN). Those who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) or a teletypewriter (TTY) should call 1-800-576-7734. or order online at: This report is also available on the Department's Web site at: offices/OSDFS. On request, this publication is available in alternate formats, such as Braille, large print, audiotape, or computer diskette. For more information, please contact the Department's Alternate Format Center at 202-260-0852 or 202-260-0818.

5 Contents Why Be Concerned? .. 1. The Scope of the Problem .. 2. What Colleges Are Doing to Address Alcohol and Other drug 4. Programs and Policies That Make a Difference .. 4. campuses With Award-winning Programs .. 6. Auburn University .. 7. Boston College .. 8. Bowling Green State University .. 9. George Mason University .. 10. Gonzaga University .. 11. Grand Valley State University .. 12. Hobart and William Smith Colleges .. 13. Hobart and William Smith Colleges .. 14. Lehigh University .. 15. Loyola Marymount University .. 16. Massachusetts Institute of Technology .. 17. Michigan State University .. 18. Montclair State University.

6 19. Rutgers University .. 20. San Diego State University .. 21. Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute .. 22. Syracuse University .. 23. The Ohio State University .. 24. The Pennsylvania State University .. 25. The State University of New York at New Paltz .. 26. iii University at Albany, State University of New York .. 27. University at Albany, State University of New York .. 28. University of Arizona .. 29. University of Arizona .. 30. University of Chicago .. 31. University of Missouri Columbia .. 32. University of Missouri Columbia .. 33. University of Nebraska Lincoln .. 34. University of Northern Colorado.

7 35. University of Pennsylvania .. 36. Utah State University .. 37. Virginia Commonwealth University .. 38. Washington State University .. 39. Western Washington University .. 40. iv Why Be Concerned? College can and should be an exciting, enriching experience. To help ensure that it will be, students and their parents will want to choose a College that fosters students' academic and social development and promotes campus and community safety. One critical element to consider is the Alcohol and Other drug culture of a campus. Far too often, Alcohol and Other drug abuse results in tragedy. Deaths from Alcohol poisoning and from Alcohol -related incidents have occurred on all types of campuses in recent years elite schools and lesser-known institutions; large schools and small ones; urban, small town, and rural schools.

8 In addition, Alcohol and Other drug abuse is a factor in the majority of accidents, injuries, vandalism, and crime on College campuses and is frequently a key factor when students encounter problems with their course work. Although the majority of College students avoid the unsafe use of Alcohol and Other drugs, they are still likely to suffer the consequences of the high-risk behaviors of their peers. Students who engage in high-risk drinking and Other drug use are not just harming themselves but also those around them, and not just occasionally but with truly disturbing frequency. By becoming informed about Alcohol and Other drug Prevention efforts on College campuses , prospective College students can increase the likelihood that they will avoid Alcohol - and Other drug -related problems and have their dreams and expectations for College met.

9 1. Alcohol and Other drug Prevention on College campuses The Scope of the Problem Studies confirm that College campuses continue to experience significant problems related to student Alcohol and Other drug abuse. Although the vast majority of College students are under the legal drinking age of 21, Alcohol remains the clear drug of choice and the one that contributes to a wide range of problems. The 2006 Monitoring the Future Survey, conducted at colleges and universities across the country, found that of all College students, approximately 40 percent have engaged in high-risk drinking. Fur- thermore, the following percentages of students used various Other drugs during 2005: marijuana ( percent); ecstasy ( percent).

10 Amphetamines ( percent); hallucinogens ( percent); cocaine ( percent); methamphetamine ( percent); and tranquilizers ( percent). Such illicit drug use has been a factor in a number of serious adverse consequences, such as hospitalizations for overdoses and deaths. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) published a report in April 2002, updated in 2005, that suggests a strong relationship between Alcohol and Other drug abuse and a variety of negative consequences for students. The report estimates that each year 1,700 College students die from Alcohol -related unintentional injuries, including motor vehicle crashes.


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