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DESIGN OF ALL-BOLTED EXTENDED DOUBLE ANGLE, …

DESIGN OF ALL-BOLTED EXTENDED DOUBLE ANGLE, SINGLE ANGLE, AND TEE SHEAR CONNECTIONS By PERRY GREEN, THOMAS SPUTO, , ADAM HIGGINS DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL & COASTAL ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA A REPORT PRESENTED TO THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF STEEL CONSTRUCTION JANUARY 2005 ii iii TABLE OF CONTENTS page LIST OF TABLES .. vi LIST OF FIGURES .. vii ix INTRODUCTION ..1 Objective and Scope of LITERATURE Connection Types ..3 bolted Moment-Rotation Behavior of Shear Coping of Beams ..9 Tee Connection Behavior ..10 Conclusion ..11 OPTIMUM BAY STUDY ..12 Bay Studies Program ..12 Bay Study Bay Steel Deck and Slab Vibration Criteria and Deflections ..13 Shear Studs and Composite Action ..14 Member Selection and Camber.

and first principles of engineering mechanics (AISC 1999). The results of this procedure will be used to determine applicable limit states and to develop a rational design procedure for all-bolted extended single angle, double angle, and tee connections. The scope of this project includes a review of past research done in the area of

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Transcription of DESIGN OF ALL-BOLTED EXTENDED DOUBLE ANGLE, …

1 DESIGN OF ALL-BOLTED EXTENDED DOUBLE ANGLE, SINGLE ANGLE, AND TEE SHEAR CONNECTIONS By PERRY GREEN, THOMAS SPUTO, , ADAM HIGGINS DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL & COASTAL ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA A REPORT PRESENTED TO THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF STEEL CONSTRUCTION JANUARY 2005 ii iii TABLE OF CONTENTS page LIST OF TABLES .. vi LIST OF FIGURES .. vii ix INTRODUCTION ..1 Objective and Scope of LITERATURE Connection Types ..3 bolted Moment-Rotation Behavior of Shear Coping of Beams ..9 Tee Connection Behavior ..10 Conclusion ..11 OPTIMUM BAY STUDY ..12 Bay Studies Program ..12 Bay Study Bay Steel Deck and Slab Vibration Criteria and Deflections ..13 Shear Studs and Composite Action ..14 Member Selection and Camber.

2 14 Optimum Bay Study Results ..15 LIMIT EXTENDED DOUBLE Angle Connection ..20 EXTENDED Single Angle EXTENDED Tee Limit State Calculations ..23 Shear Yielding ..23 Shear Rupture ..23 Flexural iv Flexural Rupture ..26 Block Shear Bolt Bolt Bolt Shear ..31 EXTENDED DESIGN TABLE EXTENDED Single and DOUBLE Angle Table Construction ..32 EXTENDED Tee Table Construction ..33 EXTENDED Tee Tables ..34 EXTENDED Tee DESIGN EXTENDED DOUBLE Angle DESIGN Example ..40 EXTENDED Single Angle DESIGN EXTENDED Tee DESIGN FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS ..51 Finite Element Model FE Discretization for FE Discretization for Girder ..53 FE Discretization for Bolts ..54 FE Model Contact Conditions ..55 FE Model Initial Conditions ..60 FE Model Applied Loading.

3 60 FE Model Boundary Conditions ..61 FE Model Material Behavior ..62 FE Analysis Results ..63 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS ..80 LIST OF REFERENCES ..82 3/4-INCH DIAMETER ALL-BOLTED A36 STEEL DOUBLE ANGLE CONNECTIONS ..85 7/8-INCH DIAMETER ALL-BOLTED A36 STEEL DOUBLE ANGLE CONNECTIONS ..110 1-INCH DIAMETER ALL-BOLTED A36 STEEL DOUBLE ANGLE CONNECTIONS ..135 3/4-INCH DIAMETER ALL-BOLTED A992 STEEL DOUBLE ANGLE CONNECTIONS ..160 7/8-INCH DIAMETER ALL-BOLTED A992 STEEL DOUBLE ANGLE CONNECTIONS ..185 v 1-INCH DIAMETER ALL-BOLTED A992 STEEL DOUBLE ANGLE CONNECTIONS ..210 3/4-INCH DIAMETER ALL-BOLTED A36 STEEL SINGLE ANGLE CONNECTIONS ..235 7/8-INCH DIAMETER ALL-BOLTED A36 STEEL SINGLE ANGLE CONNECTIONS ..260 1-INCH DIAMETER ALL-BOLTED A36 STEEL SINGLE ANGLE CONNECTIONS ..285 3/4-INCH DIAMETER ALL-BOLTED A992 STEEL SINGLE ANGLE CONNECTIONS.

4 310 7/8-INCH DIAMETER ALL-BOLTED A992 STEEL SINGLE ANGLE CONNECTIONS ..335 1-INCH DIAMETER ALL-BOLTED A992 STEEL SINGLE ANGLE CONNECTIONS ..360 3/4-INCH DIAMETER ALL-BOLTED A992 STEEL TEE CONNECTIONS ..385 7/8-INCH DIAMETER ALL-BOLTED A992 STEEL TEE CONNECTIONS ..397 1-INCH DIAMETER ALL-BOLTED A992 STEEL TEE CONNECTIONS ..409 vi LIST OF TABLES Table page Range of Girders and Beams for Typical Bay Framing Finite Element Model Contact Group Descriptions ..56 Finite Element Model Contact Surface, Pair, and Group Interactions ..57 FE Model Steel Material Properties ..63 FE Model Material Groups ..63 Corner Node Numbering ..64 vii LIST OF FIGURES Figure page Rotational Rigidity of Steel Connections ..3 Deformation of Web Angle Connection ..6 Mechanism of the Part of the Angle Connected to the Column Flange at the Ultimate Condition.

5 7 Beam Cope ..10 Bay Studies Results for 20-Foot by 20-Foot Bay with a 10-Foot Beam Bay Studies Beam Calculation Sheet for 20-Foot by 20-Foot Bay with a 10-Foot Beam Pin and Point of Fixity ..20 Moment Eccentricity ..25 Block Shear Rupture Failure Eccentricity Coefficients for Tees ..36 Retained Eccentricity Curves ..37 Coefficient C1 Curve ..38 Coefficient C2 Curve ..39 Plan View of EXTENDED DOUBLE Angle Connection EXTENDED DOUBLE Angle Standard DOUBLE Angle Detail ..43 Plan View of EXTENDED Single Angle Connection Location ..44 EXTENDED Single Angle Detail ..46 Standard Single Angle Detail ..47 viii Plan View of EXTENDED Tee Connection Location ..48 EXTENDED Tee Detail ..50 Standard Tee Connection ..50 FE Model Element Meshing ..68 FE Model Applied FE Model Boundary Conditions.

6 70 Bi-linear Stress-Strain Curve for A36 Steel Material ..71 Bi-linear Stress-Strain Curve for A572 Gr. 50 Steel Material ..71 Bi-linear Stress-Strain Curve for A325 Bolt Bi-linear Stress-Strain Curve for A490 Bolt Applied Load vs. Horizontal Z- and Vertical Y- Tip Displacement of FE Model with 5 in. Protruded Angle Leg and Material Group I ..73 Comparison of Applied Load vs. End Rotation Curves for FE Models with and 5 in. Protruded Legs and Material Group Comparison of Applied Load vs. End Rotation Curves for FE Models with A325 and A490 Bolts and 5 in. Protruded Leg ..74 Comparison of Applied Load vs. End Rotation Curves for FE Models with A36 and A572 Gr. 50 Angles and 5 in. Protruded Leg ..74 Effective Stress Plots of the Single Angle, Bolts and Girder Web for the FE Model with in.

7 Protruded Leg and Material Group I, Time Step = ..75 Effective Stress Plots of the Single Angle, Bolts and Girder Web for the FE Model with in. Protruded Leg and Material Group I, Time Step = (Maximum Applied Load) ..76 Effective Stress Plots of the Single Angle, Bolts and Girder Web for the FE Model with in. Protruded Leg and Material Group II, Time Step = 9 (Maximum Applied Load) ..77 Effective Stress Plots of the Single Angle, Bolts and Girder Web for the FE Model with in. Protruded Leg and Material Group III, Time Step = (Maximum Applied Load) ..78 ix ABSTRACT DESIGN OF ALL-BOLTED EXTENDED DOUBLE ANGLE, SINGLE ANGLE, AND TEE SHEAR CONNECTIONS This report presents a methodology for the DESIGN of ALL-BOLTED EXTENDED DOUBLE angle, single angle, and tee shear connections.

8 The report covers only the DESIGN of EXTENDED connections that involve beams and girders, but the principles set forth can be applied to connections to columns as well. Current steel connection DESIGN methodologies do not have standards for the DESIGN of EXTENDED connections which do not require that the beam be coped to allow clearance for the girder flange. Coping is an expensive and time consuming process which fabricators like to avoid if at all possible. EXTENDED connections are a practical way to avoid coping. Using basic mechanics and code specific equations, a practical DESIGN for ALL-BOLTED EXTENDED shear connections can be derived. The derived methodology is used to formulate DESIGN tables that simplify the process. This report includes examples of how to use the DESIGN tables to DESIGN ALL-BOLTED EXTENDED connections.

9 The tables include DESIGN resistances for a wide range of angle and tee materials and bolts diameters, as well as different connection types. 1 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION Background Many fabricators and erectors prefer the use of high strength bolts over welding which requires more time to make the connection and higher skilled labor. Therefore, many steel fabricators favor using ALL-BOLTED connections in order to eliminate the need for shop and/or field welding. Steel connections are categorized as either fully restrained (FR) or partially restrained (PR). FR connections assume the connections have sufficient stiffness to maintain the angles between intersecting members (American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) 1999). PR connections assume the connections have insufficient stiffness to maintain the angles between intersecting members (AISC 1999).

10 When connection restraint is ignored, commonly designated as simple framing, the connections have the following requirements: 1. The connections and the connected members shall be adequate to resist the factored gravity loads as simple beams. 2. The connections and connected members shall be adequate to resist the factored lateral loads. 3. The connections shall have sufficient inelastic rotation capacity to avoid overload of fasteners or welds under combined factored gravity and lateral loads. The scope of this research project covers only shear connections and their behavior. In the case of typical beam-to-girder shear connections, the beam must be coped (top coped, bottom coped, or top and bottom coped) in order to provide clearance for the 2 2 girder flange/s. Coping requires the flange of the beam be removed to allow for the necessary clearance.