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FM 3-24 0& 3 - Federation of American Scientists

FM 3-24. MCWP INSURGENCIES AND. COUNTERING. INSURGENCIES. MAY 2014. DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. HEADQUARTERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY. FM 3-24/MCWP , C1. Change No. 1 Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC, 2 June 2014. Insurgencies and Countering Insurgencies 1. Change 1 to FM 3-24/MCWP , 13 May 2014, amends text as necessary. 2. A plus sign (+) marks new material. 3. FM 3-24/MCWP , 13 May 2014, is changed as follows: Remove Old Pages Insert New Pages pages 1-13 through 1-14 pages 1-13 through 1-14. pages 2-3 through 2-4 pages 2-3 through 2-4. pages 4-1 through 4-2 pages 4-1 through 4-2. pages 4-5 through 4-6 pages 4-5 through 4-6.

FM 3-24/MCWP 3-33.5, C1 Change No. 1 Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC, 2 June 2014 Insurgencies and Countering Insurgencies

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Transcription of FM 3-24 0& 3 - Federation of American Scientists

1 FM 3-24. MCWP INSURGENCIES AND. COUNTERING. INSURGENCIES. MAY 2014. DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. HEADQUARTERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY. FM 3-24/MCWP , C1. Change No. 1 Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC, 2 June 2014. Insurgencies and Countering Insurgencies 1. Change 1 to FM 3-24/MCWP , 13 May 2014, amends text as necessary. 2. A plus sign (+) marks new material. 3. FM 3-24/MCWP , 13 May 2014, is changed as follows: Remove Old Pages Insert New Pages pages 1-13 through 1-14 pages 1-13 through 1-14. pages 2-3 through 2-4 pages 2-3 through 2-4. pages 4-1 through 4-2 pages 4-1 through 4-2. pages 4-5 through 4-6 pages 4-5 through 4-6.

2 Pages 4-11 through 4-12 pages 4-11 through 4-12. pages 7-5 through 7-10 pages 7-5 through 7-10. 4. File this transmittal sheet in front of the publication for reference purposes. DISTRUBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. FM 3-24/MCWP , C1. 2 June 2014. By Order of the Secretary of the Army: RAYMOND T. ODIERNO. General, United States Army Chief of Staff Official: GERALD B. O'KEEFE. Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army 1414902. BY DIRECTION OF THE COMMANDANT OF THE MARINE CORPS: DISTRIBUTION: Active Army, Army National Guard, and Army Reserve: To be distributed in accordance with the initial distribution number 121724, requirements for FM 3-24.

3 Marine Corps: PCN 143 000124 00. This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online ( ). To receive publishing updates, please subscribe at *FM 3-24/MCWP Field Manual Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC. Marine Corps Warfighting Publication Headquarters No. Marine Corps Combat Development Command Department of the Navy Headquarters United States Marine Corps Washington, DC. 13 May 2014. Insurgencies and Countering Insurgencies Contents Page INTRODUCTION ..vii PART ONE STRATEGIC AND OPERATIONAL CONTEXT. Chapter 1 UNDERSTANDING THE STRATEGIC 1-1. United States' Strategy and Policy to Counter an Insurgency .. 1-4. Land Forces and the Range of Military Operations .. 1-6.

4 Legitimacy and Control .. 1-8. Understanding Unified Action .. 1-10. Strategic Principles .. 1-19. Chapter 2 UNDERSTANDING AN OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENT .. 2-1. Demographic and Urbanization 2-1. The Operational Variables .. 2-2. The Mission Variables and Civil Considerations .. 2-10. Chapter 3 3-1. Understanding 3-1. Assessing a Cultural Situation .. 3-2. Organizing to Understand Culture .. 3-4. Distribution Restriction: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. *This publication supersedes FM 3-24/MCWP , dated 15 December 2006. Marine Corps PCN: 143 000124 00. i Contents PART TWO INSURGENCIES. Chapter 4 INSURGENCY PREREQUISITES AND FUNDAMENTALS .. 4-1. Intrastate 4-1. Insurgency Prerequisites.

5 4-3. Insurgency Fundamentals .. 4-5. Other Analytical Frameworks .. 4-22. Chapter 5 INSURGENCY THREAT CHARACTERISTICS .. 5-1. Disposition and Activities .. 5-1. Support Activities .. 5-3. Associated Threats .. 5-5. PART THREE COUNTERINSURGENCIES. Chapter 6 MISSION COMMAND AND COMMAND AND CONTROL .. 6-1. Command in Counterinsurgency .. 6-1. Headquarters Use In Counterinsurgency .. 6-4. Conventional Forces and Special Operations Forces Synchronization .. 6-5. Chapter 7 PLANNING FOR COUNTERING INSURGENCIES .. 7-1. Conceptual Planning .. 7-4. 7-10. Operational Considerations .. 7-12. Information Operations .. 7-18. Chapter 8 INTELLIGENCE .. 8-1. Intelligence Fundamentals .. 8-2. All-Source Intelligence.

6 8-3. Human Intelligence .. 8-4. Chapter 9 DIRECT APPROACHES TO COUNTER AN INSURGENCY .. 9-1. Shape-Clear-Hold-Build-Transition Framework .. 9-1. Other Direct Enablers .. 9-11. Chapter 10 INDIRECT METHODS FOR COUNTERING 10-1. Nation Assistance and Security Cooperation .. 10-1. Generational Engagement .. 10-2. Negotiation and Diplomacy .. 10-4. Identify, Separate, Isolate, Influence, and Reintegrate .. 10-6. Other Indirect Enablers .. 10-10. Chapter 11 WORKING WITH HOST-NATION FORCES .. 11-1. Assessing and Developing a Host-Nation Force .. 11-2. 11-6. Security Cooperation Planning .. 11-8. Chapter 12 ASSESSMENTS .. 12-1. Assessment Frameworks .. 12-1. Assessment Methods .. 12-2. Assessment Considerations.

7 12-2. Developing Measurement Criteria .. 12-3. ii FM 3-24/MCWP 13 May 2014. Contents Chapter 13 LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS .. 13-1. Authority to Assist A Foreign Government .. 13-1. Rules of Engagement .. 13-2. Law of War .. 13-2. Non-International Armed Conflict .. 13-7. Detention and Interrogation .. 13-8. Enforcing Discipline of Forces .. 13-10. Training and Equipping Foreign Forces .. 13-11. Commander's Emergency Response Program .. 13-12. Claims and 13-13. Establishing the Rule of Law .. 13-13. SOURCE NOTES .. Source Notes-1. GLOSSARY .. Glossary-1. REFERENCES .. References-1. INDEX .. Index-1. Figures Figure 1-1. Country team command relationships .. 1-17. Figure 4-1. Conflict resolution model.

8 4-15. Figure 4-2. Organizational elements of an insurgency .. 4-16. Figure 4-3. Networked insurgencies .. 4-18. Figure 4-4. Examples of dyads .. 4-19. Figure 4-5. Examples of dyad networks .. 4-21. Figure 4-6. Example of changes to tactics based on density shift .. 4-22. Figure 7-1. Design concept .. 7-5. Figure 7-2. Sample of individual lines of effort .. 7-9. Figure 9-1. The capability spectrum of counterinsurgency conflict .. 9-5. Figure 9-2. Example of a possible transition framework .. 9-11. Figure 10-1. Generational engagement .. 10-2. Figure 10-2. Negotiation and 10-5. Figure 11-1. Host-nation security force meter .. 11-5. Figure 11-2. Counterinsurgency command relationships.

9 11-6. Figure 11-3. Country planning .. 11-9. Figure 11-4. Phases of building a host-nation security force .. 11-11. Figure 13-1. Provisions binding high contracting parties .. 13-8. Tables Table 1-1. Ends, ways, means, and risk in countering an insurgency .. 1-5. Table 2-1. Interrelated dimensions of the information environment .. 2-8. 13 May 2014 FM 3-24/MCWP iii Contents Table 11-1. Developing a host-nation security force .. 11-1. Table 11-2. Host-nation contributions .. 11-13. Table 13-1. Extract of the Detainee Treatment Act of 2005 .. 13-9. iv FM 3-24/MCWP 13 May 2014. Preface Field Manual (FM) 3-24/ Marine Corps Warfighting Publication (MCWP) provides doctrine for Army and Marine units that are countering an insurgency.

10 It provides a doctrinal foundation for counterinsurgency. FM 3-24/MCWP is a guide for units fighting or training for counterinsurgency operations. The principal audience for FM 3-24/MCWP is battalion, brigade, and regimental commanders and their staffs. Commanders and staffs of Army and Marine Corps headquarters serving as joint task force or multinational headquarters should also refer to applicable joint or multinational doctrine concerning the range of military operations and joint or multinational forces. Trainers and educators throughout the Army and Marine Corps will also use this publication. Commanders, staffs, and subordinates ensure their decisions and actions comply with applicable United States ( ), international, and, in some cases, host-nation laws and regulations.


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