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National Advisory Committee on Creative and …

National Advisory Committee on Creative and Cultural Education all our futures : Creativity, Culture and Education Report to the Secretary of State for Education and Employment the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport May 1999. Contents Terms of Reference 2. Membership of the Committee 3. Introduction and Summary 5. Part One: Facing the future 1. The Challenge for Education 17. 2. Creative Education 28. 3. Cultural Education 44. 4. Meeting the Challenge 61. Part Two: A New Balance 5. Developing the Curriculum 72. 6. Teaching and Learning 101. 7. Raising Standards 124. Part Three: Beyond the School 8. Developing Partnerships 138. 9. Funding and Resources 160.

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1 National Advisory Committee on Creative and Cultural Education all our futures : Creativity, Culture and Education Report to the Secretary of State for Education and Employment the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport May 1999. Contents Terms of Reference 2. Membership of the Committee 3. Introduction and Summary 5. Part One: Facing the future 1. The Challenge for Education 17. 2. Creative Education 28. 3. Cultural Education 44. 4. Meeting the Challenge 61. Part Two: A New Balance 5. Developing the Curriculum 72. 6. Teaching and Learning 101. 7. Raising Standards 124. Part Three: Beyond the School 8. Developing Partnerships 138. 9. Funding and Resources 160.

2 10. Training People 174. Part Four: A National Strategy Looking Ahead 190. Detailed Recommendations 192. Appendices A. Patterns of Provision 205. B. Abbreviations, Notes and References 221. C. Acknowledgements 228. D. Research and Consultations 229. Contents NACCCE report 1. Terms of Reference The National Advisory Committee on Creative and Cultural Education was established in February 1998 by the Secretary of State for Education and Employment, the Rt. Hon David Blunkett MP and the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, the Rt. Hon Chris Smith MP. Our terms of reference are: To make recommendations to the Secretaries of State on the Creative and cultural development of young people through formal and informal education: to take stock of current provision and to make proposals for principles, policies and practice.

3 This report makes recommendations for provision in formal and informal education for young people to the age of 16: that is, to the end of compulsory education. Our inquiry coincides with the Government s planned review of the National Curriculum. This report includes specific recommendations on the National Curriculum. It also includes recommendations for a wider National strategy for Creative and cultural education. Terms of Reference NACCCE report 2. Membership of the Committee Professor Ken Robinson (Chairman), University of Warwick Professor Lewis Minkin (Vice-chair), Sheffield Hallam University Professor Eric Bolton CB, Formerly Senior Chief Inspector Dawn French, Actor/Comedian Lindsey Fryer, Vice-chair, Engage The National Association of Gallery Education Professor Susan Greenfield, University of Oxford Valerie Hannon, Chief Education Officer, Derbyshire Lenny Henry CBE, Actor/Comedian Dawn Holgate, Director of Education, Phoenix Dance Company Dame Tamsyn Imison, Head, Hampstead School, London Clive Jones, Chief Executive, Carlton Television Judith Kelly OBE, Artistic Director, West Yorkshire Playhouse Professor Sir Harold Kroto Kt.

4 , FRS, University of Sussex Sir Claus Moser KCB, CBE, FBA, Chairman, Basic Skills Agency Sir Simon Rattle Kt., CBE, Conductor Lord Stone of Blackheath, Managing Director, Marks & Spencer plc Professor Helen Storey, Fashion Designer Carol Traynor, Head, St Boniface RC Primary School, Salford Research Officer Mathilda Joubert Administrative Officer Lynn Green Membership of the Committee NACCCE report 3. Observers John Connolly, DfEE (from August 1998). Julian Critchley, DfEE. Janet Dawson, DfEE. Theresa Downing, DfEE (to August 1998). Tony Dyer, DCMS (from December 1998). Patrick Fallon, DCMS (to November 1998). David Fawcett, DCMS (to November 1998). Allan Ferries, DCMS (from December 1998).

5 Peter Jones HMI, OFSTED. Tony Knight, QCA. Angela Walsh, TTA. Membership of the Committee NACCCE report 4. Introduction and Summary The Purpose of this Report i. In 1997, the Government published its White Paper Excellence Our aim must be to create a nation in Schools. It described education as a vital investment in where the Creative talents of all the people are used to build a true human capital for the twenty-first century. It argued that one enterprise economy for the twenty- of the problems in education is the low expectations of young first century where we compete on people s abilities and that it is essential to raise morale, brains, not brawn. motivation and self esteem in schools.

6 The main focus of the The Prime Minister, the Rt. Hon White Paper was on raising standards in literacy and numeracy. Tony Blair MP. But this will not be enough to meet the challenges that face education, and the White Paper recognised this. It also said: If we are to prepare successfully for the twenty-first ..we cannot rely on a small lite, no century we will have to do more than just improve matter how highly educated or highly paid. Instead we need the creativity, literacy and numeracy skills. We need a broad, enterprise and scholarship of all our flexible and motivating education that recognises people. the different talents of all children and delivers Rt. Hon David Blunkett MP, excellence for everyone.

7 Secretary of State for Education and Employment It emphasised the urgent need to unlock the potential of every young person and argued that Britain s economic prosperity and social cohesion depend on this. ii. This report argues that a National strategy for Creative and We must change the concept of cultural education is essential to that process. We put the case creativity from being something that is added on to education, skills, for developing Creative and cultural education; we consider training and management and make what is involved; we look at current provision and assess the sure it becomes intrinsic to all of opportunities and obstacles; and we set out a National strategy.

8 These. By Creative education we mean forms of education that Rt. Hon Chris Smith MP, Secretary develop young people s capacities for original ideas and action: of State for Culture, Media and by cultural education we mean forms of education that enable Sport them to engage positively with the growing complexity and diversity of social values and ways of life. We argue that there are important relationships between Creative and cultural education, and significant implications for methods of teaching and assessment, the balance of the school curriculum and for partnerships between schools and the wider world. What is this Report About? iii. Our report develops five main themes: The Challenge for Education Education faces challenges that are without precedent.

9 Meeting these challenges calls for new priorities in education, Introduction and Summary NACCCE report 5. including a much stronger emphasis on Creative and cultural education and a new balance in teaching and in the curriculum. Creative Potential Creativity is possible in all areas of human activity, including the arts, sciences, at work at play and in all other areas of daily life. All people have Creative abilities and we all have them differently. When individuals find their Creative strengths, it can have an enormous impact on self-esteem and on overall achievement. Freedom and Control Creativity is not simply a matter of letting go. Serious Creative achievement relies on knowledge, control of materials and command of ideas.

10 Creative education involves a balance between teaching knowledge and skills, and encouraging innovation. In these ways, Creative development is directly related to cultural education. Cultural Understanding Young people are living in times of rapid cultural change and of increasing cultural diversity. Education must enable them to understand and respect different cultural values and traditions and the processes of cultural change and development. The engine of cultural change is the human capacity for Creative thought and action. A Systemic Approach Creative and cultural education are not subjects in the curriculum, they are general functions of education. Promoting them effectively calls for a systemic strategy: one that addresses the balance of the school curriculum, teaching methods and assessment, how schools connect with other people and resources and the training and development of teachers and others.


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