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StudentAchievemen tDivision Building Series - Ontario

Capacity Building Series SPECIAL EDITION #24. Getting Started with What is inquiry? Student Inquiry Inquiry is an approach to learning There is growing consensus, both provincially and internationally, that greater student whereby students find and use a engagement leads to greater student achievement (Cummins, et al.,2005; Flessa variety of sources of information and et al., 2010; Leithwood, McAdie, Bascia, & Rodrigue, 2006; Willms, Friesen, & Milton, ideas to increase their understanding 2009). While engaged students may appreciate extrinsic rewards such as good grades of a problem, topic or issue of impor- or praise, their motivation is not dependent on them. They are engaged in learning because they find it interesting, enjoyable and self-fulfilling. Intellectually engaged tance. It requires more than simply learners stay on task, view errors as learning opportunities and persist in their efforts answering questions or getting a right to overcome challenges.

e c t i o n n d d b a c k 3 nquiryProcess engageintheexploratoryphase,theymayreturntotheirinitialtopicor intheanalyticphase,theymaydiscoverthattheyneedtoreturntotheir

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Transcription of StudentAchievemen tDivision Building Series - Ontario

1 Capacity Building Series SPECIAL EDITION #24. Getting Started with What is inquiry? Student Inquiry Inquiry is an approach to learning There is growing consensus, both provincially and internationally, that greater student whereby students find and use a engagement leads to greater student achievement (Cummins, et al.,2005; Flessa variety of sources of information and et al., 2010; Leithwood, McAdie, Bascia, & Rodrigue, 2006; Willms, Friesen, & Milton, ideas to increase their understanding 2009). While engaged students may appreciate extrinsic rewards such as good grades of a problem, topic or issue of impor- or praise, their motivation is not dependent on them. They are engaged in learning because they find it interesting, enjoyable and self-fulfilling. Intellectually engaged tance. It requires more than simply learners stay on task, view errors as learning opportunities and persist in their efforts answering questions or getting a right to overcome challenges.

2 They are passionate about and committed to solving prob- answer. It espouses investigation, lems, developing understanding and moving their thinking forward (Jang, Reeve &. exploration, search, quest, research, Deci, 2010; NCREL online). pursuit and study. It is enhanced by Research suggests that students are more likely to develop as engaged, self-directed involvement with a community of learners in inquiry-based classrooms (Jang, Reeve & Deci, 2010; NCREL online). In learners, each learning from the other words, whether students use self-regulating tactics in school, what kinds of other in social interaction. strategies they use, how they are rewarded for their use, and how much effort Kuklthau, Maniotes & Caspari, they expend being regulated and strategic, depends on the tasks and contexts that teachers create for students (Paris & Paris, 2001, p.)

3 93). 2007, p. 2. This monograph has been developed for teachers who are beginning to include student inquiry as an approach to learning. Drawing on models from Ontario , Manitoba, British Columbia, the and Australia, it anchors the inquiry process in four key phases and identifies teacher and student actions for each. It ends with six tips for getting started and a brief summary of key principles. The Capacity Building Series is produced by the Student October 2011 Student Achievement Division Achievement Division to support leadership and instructional ISSN: 1913 8482 (Print) effectiveness in Ontario schools. The Series is posted at: ISSN: 1913 8490 (Online) For information: The Student In The four phases of inquiry are fluid and recursive. For example, as students question and revise it according to new insights and information.

4 Similarly, research. And when they share their findings, and engage in discussion, the new question or topic. Focus When students are engaged in this phase of the inquiry process, they . When educators are supporting this phase of the student inquiry process, they . Initial engagement notice, wonder and ask questions value student thinking Selection of an inquiry about a topic of interest strategically model wondering and making focus / question / topic share their thinking and questions predictions with their peers and teachers listen, observe and talk with students to assess dialogue about possible ways to interests, knowledge and needs learn more introduce learning tasks that build on prior knowl- re-frame questions edge and engage students in thinking further make predictions about possible about the topic outcomes or answers identify a focus connecting the topic to a big idea.

5 In curriculum cluster expectations across curriculum that relate to the topic dialogue with students about ways of learning more about the topic provide time for student talk Refle an Feed Share Learning When students are engaged in this phase of the inquiry process, they . When educators are supporting this phase of the student inquiry process, they . Communicate plan ways to express their learning facilitate discussions in which students make Communicate findings considering a variety of representations connections between prior knowledge and new articulate connections between prior discoveries Dialogue knowledge and new discoveries emphasize choice, differentiation and high level- Go further answer and refine questions thinking about the topic Reflection pose new, deeper questions for challenge and extend students' understandings independent investigation and skills identify avenues for action and provide opportunities for students to demonstrate application the progress of their inquiry apply understandings to different encourage students to assess their learning and contexts and situations ways of learning create opportunities together to evaluate student learning related to curriculum celebrate the learning journey expectations reflect on what, how and why plan, with students, alternative experiences or learning happened avenues of inquiry to gain new or deeper insights create opportunities with students to celebrating the learning journey 2.

6 Nquiry Process engage in the exploratory phase, they may return to their initial topic or in the analytic phase, they may discover that they need to return to their ey may decide to return to the beginning of their inquiry and develop a Explore When students are engaged in this phase of the inquiry process, they . When educators are supporting this phase of the student inquiry process, they . Find out more gather information first-hand in a introduce tasks in which students use prior knowl- Investigate range of ways and from a variety edge to generate new ideas and explore questions of sources and possibilities connect current thinking to previous extend student thinking with open-ended questions knowledge challenge students' prior knowledge and beliefs clarify and extend questions model how to plan, observe and reflect talk about observations and thinking encourage students to share their ideas with each to generate more questions other record information and keep work post banks of student questions samples provide additional information about the topic for students with limited knowledge/experience provide opportunities for peer and self-assessment talk with students about refining/adjusting initial plans ection nd dback Analyze When students are engaged in this phase of the inquiry process, they.

7 When educators are supporting this phase of the student inquiry process, they . Summarize /synthesize use information to answer questions introduce new concepts, processes and skills that Draw conclusions and test hypotheses relate to the inquiry Construct new learning draw conclusions about questions observe and strategically question students to and hypotheses clarify and extend their thinking describe characteristics and notice provide opportunities for students to demonstrate patterns their understanding, skills and new learning compare, sort, classify and interpret provide a variety of opportunities for self and peer information assessment talk about their learning/concept revisit initial questions and thinking with students understanding strategically model ways to describe patterns, think about the information to create analyze information and draw conclusions from new questions and hypotheses a variety of sources Adapted from: Ontario SCHOOL LIBRARY ASSOCIATION MANITOBA INQUIRY PROCESS OR CYCLE THE STRIPLING MODEL ( ) POINTS OF INQUIRY MODEL (British Columbia) INTEGRATED INQUIRY PLANNING MODEL (Australia) INQUIRY PROCESS IN EARLY LEARNING KINDERGARTEN CLASSROOMS ( Ontario ).

8 3. 6 Tips for Getting Started 1 Make the curriculum work for you connect the big ideas 5 Slow down give your students time to explore their to the daily questions and interests of your students. thinking with each other while you listen and think 2 Design learning opportunities that encourage students to about: explore authentic, real-life experiences based on these What are my students showing me? What should we curriculum expectations. do next? 3 Don't take over tune in to your students, not just the topic. 6 Talk to students and reflect every day about what, how and why learning is happening: 4 Talk with your students about ways of learning more about the topic by asking: What are we learning about this topic? What do we want to understand more deeply? What are we learning about ourselves? What big questions will we explore?

9 What do we think and know now? What is important to know about this? What does this mean for us as learners? In Sum Inquiry allows students to make decisions about their subject area or appropriate for only some students. It is learning and to take responsibility for it. at the heart of learning in all subject areas (The Ontario Teachers create learning contexts that allow students to Curriculum, Grades 1 8: Language, 2006, p. 29; The Full Day make decisions about their learning processes and about Early Learning Kindergarten Program, 2010 2011, pp. 14 16;. how they will demonstrate their learning. They encourage The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1 8: Science and Technology, collaborative learning and create intellectual spaces for 2007, pp. 12 18; The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1 8: The Arts, students to engage in rich talk about their thinking and 2009, pp.)

10 19 28). learning. They create a classroom ethos that fosters respect Inquiry builds on children's natural curiosity and leads for others' ideas and opinions and encourages risk-taking. to the development of higher-order thinking skills. Teachers introduce instruction and assessment strategies that keep students focused on personal improvement. They Children are open to wonder and puzzlement (Galileo make sure that students have the necessary knowledge, Educational Network) and are eager to learn about their skills and strategies to operate independently, make world. This natural inquisitiveness is nurtured when teachers appropriate choices, and expand their abilities by attempt- adopt an inquiry approach. As teachers give students oppor- ing challenging tasks (Perry, Phillips & Dowler, 2004, tunities to seek answers to questions that are interesting, p.


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