Example: barber

The American Journal of Sports Medicine

The American Journal of Sports Medicine Heavy-Load Eccentric Calf Muscle Training For the Treatment of Chronic Achilles Tendinosis H kan Alfredson, Tom Pietil , Per Jonsson and Ronny Lorentzon Am J Sports Med 1998 26: 360. The online version of this article can be found at: Published by: On behalf of: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Additional services and information for The American Journal of Sports Medicine can be found at: Email Alerts: Subscriptions: Reprints: Permissions: Downloaded from at OREGON STATE UNIV LIBRARY on August 20, 2009.

Heavy-Load Eccentric Calf Muscle Training For the Treatment of Chronic Achilles Tendinosis Håkan Alfredson, MD, Tom Pietila¨, RPT, Per Jonsson, RPT, and

Tags:

  Journal, Sports, American, Medicine, The american journal of sports medicine

Information

Domain:

Source:

Link to this page:

Please notify us if you found a problem with this document:

Other abuse

Transcription of The American Journal of Sports Medicine

1 The American Journal of Sports Medicine Heavy-Load Eccentric Calf Muscle Training For the Treatment of Chronic Achilles Tendinosis H kan Alfredson, Tom Pietil , Per Jonsson and Ronny Lorentzon Am J Sports Med 1998 26: 360. The online version of this article can be found at: Published by: On behalf of: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Additional services and information for The American Journal of Sports Medicine can be found at: Email Alerts: Subscriptions: Reprints: Permissions: Downloaded from at OREGON STATE UNIV LIBRARY on August 20, 2009.

2 0363-5465/98/2626-0360$ THE American Journal OF Sports Medicine , Vol. 26, No. 3. 1998 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Heavy-Load Eccentric Calf Muscle Training For the Treatment of Chronic Achilles Tendinosis H kan Alfredson, MD, Tom Pietila , RPT, Per Jonsson, RPT, and Ronny Lorentzon,* MD, PhD. From the Sports Medicine Unit, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University Hospital of Northern Sweden, Ume , Sweden ABSTRACT Overuse injuries involving the Achilles tendon are com- mon, especially among , 8, 19, 20 The majority of We prospectively studied the effect of heavy-load ec- Achilles tendon overuse injuries occur in men, and they centric calf muscle training in 15 recreational athletes occur at a higher rate in middle-aged athletes than do (12 men and 3 women; mean age, !)

3 Years) most other overuse , 10 Nonsurgical treatment is who had the diagnosis of chronic Achilles tendinosis not always successful, and surgery is required in about (degenerative changes) with a long duration of symp- 25% of these Frequency of surgery increases toms despite conventional nonsurgical treatment. Calf with patient age, duration of symptoms, and occurrence of muscle strength and the amount of pain during activity tendinopathic (recorded on a visual analog scale) were measured There are only a few studies on calf muscle strength in before onset of training and after 12 weeks of eccentric patients with Achilles tendon disorders.

4 Calf muscle training. At week 0, all patients had Achilles tendon strength has been measured after rehabilitation in pa- pain not allowing running activity, and there was sig- tients with surgically treated complete Achilles tendon nificantly lower eccentric and concentric calf muscle ruptures4, 14, 15, 17 and in patients with complete Achilles strength on the injured compared with the noninjured tendon ruptures treated either surgically or nonsurgi- side. After the 12-week training period, all 15 patients , 18 We have recently, in two prospective studies on were back at their preinjury levels with full running middle-aged recreational athletes with chronic Achilles activity.

5 There was a significant decrease in pain dur- tendinitis/tendinosis, reported the results of surgical treatment followed by 6 weeks of immobilization and of ing activity, and the calf muscle strength on the injured surgical treatment followed by 2 weeks of immobiliza- side had increased significantly and did not differ sig- , 2 The results showed that it took a long time to nificantly from that of the noninjured side. A compari- recover concentric and eccentric calf muscle strength, de- son group of 15 recreational athletes with the same spite a controlled postoperative rehabilitation including diagnosis and a long duration of symptoms had been eccentric calf muscle training.

6 The postoperative immobi- treated conventionally, , rest, nonsteroidal antiin- lization time, 6 weeks compared with 2 weeks, did not flammatory drugs, changes of shoes or orthoses, phys- seem to have any influence on the time to recovery of calf ical therapy, and in all cases also with ordinary training muscle strength or on the time to resumption of previous programs. In no case was the conventional treatment activity levels. successful, and all patients were ultimately treated A literature review indicated that there are no prospec- surgically.

7 Our treatment model with heavy-load ec- tive studies on eccentric calf muscle training in patients centric calf muscle training has a very good short-term with Achilles tendinopathies. Stanish et have re- effect on athletes in their early forties. ported good results with an eccentric training regimen in patients with chronic tendinitis. However, to the best of our knowledge, no scientific data on these patients have been reported. * Address correspondence and reprint requests to Ronny Lorentzon, MD, At our clinic, we have surgically treated patients with PhD, Sports Medicine Unit, University of Ume , S-901 87 Ume , Sweden.

8 No author or related institution has received any financial benefit from chronic Achilles tendinosis who do not respond to conven- research in this study. tional nonsurgical treatment. The aim of this study was to 360. Downloaded from at OREGON STATE UNIV LIBRARY on August 20, 2009. Vol. 26, No. 3, 1998 Calf Muscle Training For Chronic Achilles Tendinosis 361. prospectively study the short-term effect of heavy-load deg/sec (10 repetitions) of angular velocity. Eccentric plan- eccentric calf muscle training on tendon pain during ac- tar flexion peak torque and total work were measured at tivity and on calf muscle strength in patients with chronic 90 deg/sec (3 repetitions).

9 All tests in all patients were Achilles tendinosis who were selected for surgical done at about the same time of the day (between 9 AM and treatment. noon). The warm-up procedure consisted of 10 minutes of bicycling. For testing, the patients were seated with the knee positioned at 40 of flexion and with a hip angle of MATERIALS AND METHODS. 110 . The axis of rotation in neutral position passes Fifteen consecutive recreational athletes (12 men and 3 through the body of the talus, the fibular malleolus, and women; mean age, !)

10 Years) with the diagnosis of through or just below the tibial malleolus. Strength was Achilles tendinosis and a long duration of symptoms ( measured between 20 of dorsal flexion and 30 of plantar months; range, 3 to 100) had pain during running and had flexion. The strength of the injured side was compared tried conventional treatment (rest, nonsteroidal antiin- with the strength of the noninjured side. All tests were flammatory drugs, changes of shoes or orthoses, physical performed by the same physical therapist.


Related search queries