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Using DNA to Solve Cold Case - Office of Justice Programs

Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs National Institute of Justice JULY 02. Special REPORT. Using DNA to Solve Cold Cases Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs 810 Seventh Street Washington, DC 20531. John Ashcroft Attorney General Deborah J. Daniels Assistant Attorney General Sarah V. Hart Director, National Institute of Justice This and other publications and products of the Department of Justice , Office of Justice Programs and NIJ can be found on the World Wide Web at the following sites: Office of Justice Programs National Institute of Justice Photographs copyright 2002 PhotoDisc, Inc. JULY 02. Using DNA to Solve Cold Cases NCJ 194197. Sarah V. Hart Director National Institute of Justice This document is not intended to create, does not create, and may not be relied upon to create any rights, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law by any party in any matter civil or criminal.

Using DNA to Solve Cold Cases is intend-ed for use by law enforcement and other criminal justice professionals who have the responsibility for reviewing and inves-tigating unsolved cases. This report will provide basic information to assist agen-cies in the complex process of case review with a specific emphasis on using

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Transcription of Using DNA to Solve Cold Case - Office of Justice Programs

1 Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs National Institute of Justice JULY 02. Special REPORT. Using DNA to Solve Cold Cases Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs 810 Seventh Street Washington, DC 20531. John Ashcroft Attorney General Deborah J. Daniels Assistant Attorney General Sarah V. Hart Director, National Institute of Justice This and other publications and products of the Department of Justice , Office of Justice Programs and NIJ can be found on the World Wide Web at the following sites: Office of Justice Programs National Institute of Justice Photographs copyright 2002 PhotoDisc, Inc. JULY 02. Using DNA to Solve Cold Cases NCJ 194197. Sarah V. Hart Director National Institute of Justice This document is not intended to create, does not create, and may not be relied upon to create any rights, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law by any party in any matter civil or criminal.

2 Findings and conclusions of the research reported here are those of the authors and do not reflect the official position or policies of the Department of Justice . The National Institute of Justice is a component of the Office of Justice Programs , which also includes the Bureau of Justice Assistance, the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, and the Office for Victims of Crime. National Commission on the Future of DNA Evidence In 1995, the National Institute of Justice collection, laboratory funding, legal issues, (NIJ) began research that would attempt and research and development. The to identify how often DNA had exonerated Commission's working groups, consisting wrongfully convicted defendants. After of commissioners and other experts, extensive study, NIJ published the report researched and examined various topics Convicted by Juries, Exonerated by and reported back to the Commission.

3 The Science: case Studies in the Use of DNA working groups' reports were submitted Evidence to Establish Innocence After to the full Commission for approval, Trial, which presents case studies of 28 amendment, or further discussion and pro- inmates for whom DNA analysis was vided the Commission with background exculpatory. for its recommendations to the Attorney General. On learning of the breadth and scope of the issues related to forensic DNA, the By nature of its representative composition Attorney General asked NIJ to establish and its use of numerous working groups, the National Commission on the Future of the Commission received valuable input DNA Evidence as a means to examine the from all areas of the criminal Justice sys- most effective use of DNA in the criminal tem. The broad scope of that input enabled Justice system. The Commission was the Commission to develop recommenda- appointed by the NIJ Director and repre- tions that both maximize the investigative sented the broad spectrum of the criminal value of the technology and address the Justice system.

4 Chaired by the Honorable issues raised by its application. Shirley S. Abrahamson, Chief Justice of the Wisconsin Supreme Court, the Com- mission consisted of representatives from Commission members the prosecution, the defense bar, law enforcement, the scientific community, Chair the medical examiner community, acade- mia, and victims' rights organizations. The Honorable Shirley S. Abrahamson Chief Justice The Commission's charge was to submit Wisconsin Supreme Court recommendations to the Attorney General that will help ensure the best use of DNA Members as a crimefighting tool and foster its use throughout the entire criminal Justice Dwight E. Adams system. Other focal areas for the Com- Director mission's consideration included crime Federal Bureau of Investigation Laboratory scene investigation and evidence iii SPECIAL REPORT / JULY 02. Jan S. Bashinski Ronald S.

5 Reinstein Chief Associate Presiding Judge Bureau of Forensic Services Superior Court of Arizona California Department of Justice Maricopa County, Arizona Sacramento, California Darrell L. Sanders George W. Clarke Chief Deputy District Attorney Frankfort Police Department San Diego, California Frankfort, Illinois James F. Crow Barry C. Scheck Professor Professor Department of Genetics Cardozo Law School University of Wisconsin New York, New York Lloyd N. Cutler Michael Smith Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering Professor Washington, University of Wisconsin Law School Joseph H. Davis Jeffrey E. Thoma Former Director Public Defender Miami-Dade Medical Examiner Mendocino County, California Department Kathryn M. Turman Paul B. Ferrara Director Director Office for Victim Assistance Division of Forensic Sciences Federal Bureau of Investigation Commonwealth of Virginia William Webster Norman Gahn Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy Assistant District Attorney Washington, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin James R.

6 Wooley Terrance W. Gainer Baker & Hostetler Executive Assistant Chief Cleveland, Ohio Metropolitan Police Department Washington, Commission staff Terry G. Hillard Christopher H. Asplen Superintendent of Police Executive Director Chicago Police Department Chicago, Illinois Lisa Forman Deputy Director Aaron D. Kennard Sheriff Robin W. Jones Salt Lake County, Utah Executive Assistant Philip Reilly Interleukin Genetics Waltham, Massachusetts iv Using DNA TO Solve COLD CASES. Crime Scene Investigation Working Group The Crime Scene Investigation Working review with a specific emphasis on Using Group is a multidisciplinary group of criminal DNA evidence to Solve previously unsolv- Justice professionals from across the United able crimes. Although DNA is not the States who represent both urban and rural only forensic tool that can be valuable to jurisdictions. Working group members and unsolved case investigations, advance- contributors were recommended and ments in DNA technology and the success selected for their experience in the area of of DNA database systems have inspired criminal investigation and evidence collec- law enforcement agencies throughout the tion from the standpoints of law enforce- country to reevaluate cold cases for DNA.

7 Ment, prosecution, defense, the forensic evidence. As law enforcement profession- laboratory, and victim assistance. als progress through investigations, how- ever, they should keep in mind the array of DNA has proven to be a powerful tool in other technology advancements, such as the fight against crime. DNA evidence can improved ballistics and fingerprint data- identify suspects, convict the guilty, and bases, which may substantially advance exonerate the innocent. Throughout the a case beyond its original level. Nation, criminal Justice professionals are discovering that advancements in DNA. technology are breathing new life into old, Chair cold, or unsolved criminal cases. Evidence Terrance W. Gainer that was previously unsuitable for DNA Executive Assistant Chief testing because a biological sample was Metropolitan Police Department too small or degraded may now yield a Washington, DNA profile.

8 Development of the Com- bined DNA Index System (CODIS) at the State and national levels enables law Members enforcement to aid investigations by effec- Susan Ballou tively and efficiently identifying suspects Office of Law Enforcement Standards and linking serial crimes to each other. The National Institute of Standards and National Commission on the Future of Technology DNA Evidence made clear, however, that Gaithersburg, Maryland we must dedicate more resources to empower law enforcement to use this Jan S. Bashinski technology quickly and effectively. Chief Bureau of Forensic Services Using DNA to Solve Cold Cases is intend- California Department of Justice ed for use by law enforcement and other Sacramento, California criminal Justice professionals who have the responsibility for reviewing and inves- Sue Brown tigating unsolved cases. This report will INOVA Fairfax Hospital provide basic information to assist agen- SANE Program cies in the complex process of case Falls Church, Virginia v SPECIAL REPORT / JULY 02.

9 Lee Colwell Darrell L. Sanders Director Chief Criminal Justice Institute Frankfort Police Department University of Arkansas System Frankfort, Illinois Little Rock, Arkansas Clay Strange Thomas J. Cronin Assistant District Attorney Chief Travis County District Attorney's Office City of Coeur d'Alene Police Department Austin, Texas Coeur d'Alene, Idaho Terry G. Hillard Contributors Superintendent of Police Cheryl May Chicago Police Department Assistant Director Chicago, Illinois Forensic Sciences Education Center Little Rock, Arkansas Mark Johnsey Master Sergeant (Ret.) William McIntyre Division of Forensic Services Detective Sergeant (Ret.). Illinois State Police Department Atlantic County Prosecutor's Office Springfield, Illinois Homicide Unit Hammonton, New Jersey Christopher Plourd Attorney at Law San Diego, California vi Contents National Commission on the Future of DNA Evidence.

10 Iii Introduction .. 1. The Long and Short of DNA .. 5. How Can DNA Databases Aid Investigations? .. 9. Practical Considerations .. 13. Identifying, Analyzing, and Prioritizing Cases .. 17. vii Introduction In 1990, a series of brutal attacks on elder- had been convicted of shooting into an ly victims occurred in Goldsboro, North occupied dwelling, an offense that Carolina, by an unknown individual dubbed requires inclusion in the North Carolina the Night Stalker. During one such DNA database. The suspect was brought attack in March, an elderly woman was into custody for questioning and was brutally raped and almost murdered. Her served with a search warrant to obtain a daughter's early arrival home was the only sample of his blood. That sample was ana- thing that saved the woman's life. The lyzed and compared to the crime scene suspect fled, leaving behind materials evidence, thereby confirming the DNA.


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