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WAY€BACK€WHEN:€LOOKING€BACK€IN€HISTORY …

WAY BACK WHEN: LOOKING BACK IN HISTORY. Happenings in the cookeville area as recorded in the pages of the Herald Citizen Newspaper, cookeville , TN. By Bob McMillian 1930's (Compiled by Audrey J. Lambert). 1930. (January 2, 1930) The E. P. Maxwell grocery store on West Main Street was destroyed by fire this week. The alarm was sounded too late for firemen to put out the blaze. The building, owned by Mrs. H. M. Mackie, was insured for $800. *Some 200 rural farm women, including some from this area, will meet at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville this week for UT's annual farm women's short course offered by the university's home economics department. (January 9, 1930) Sheriff Warren and his deputies broke a ring of thieves this week. They arrested four young men at their homes after an intense investigation. The men were charged with a string of thefts, including this week's robbery of the Bank of Algood. The sheriff tracked the four from the bank to where their getaway car was parked using bloodhounds and used the clues he found on the scene there to continue trailing them.

WAY€BACK€WHEN:€LOOKING€BACK€IN€HISTORY Happenings€in€the€Cookeville€area€as€recorded€in€the€pages€of€the Herald€Citizen€Newspaper,€Cookeville,€TN.

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1 WAY BACK WHEN: LOOKING BACK IN HISTORY. Happenings in the cookeville area as recorded in the pages of the Herald Citizen Newspaper, cookeville , TN. By Bob McMillian 1930's (Compiled by Audrey J. Lambert). 1930. (January 2, 1930) The E. P. Maxwell grocery store on West Main Street was destroyed by fire this week. The alarm was sounded too late for firemen to put out the blaze. The building, owned by Mrs. H. M. Mackie, was insured for $800. *Some 200 rural farm women, including some from this area, will meet at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville this week for UT's annual farm women's short course offered by the university's home economics department. (January 9, 1930) Sheriff Warren and his deputies broke a ring of thieves this week. They arrested four young men at their homes after an intense investigation. The men were charged with a string of thefts, including this week's robbery of the Bank of Algood. The sheriff tracked the four from the bank to where their getaway car was parked using bloodhounds and used the clues he found on the scene there to continue trailing them.

2 The bloodhounds are owned and trained by the Pippin brothers from Double Springs. (January 16, 1930) County road supervisor H. D. Whitson gave his annual road report for 1929 this week. Operating on a $13,827 budget and using the labor of jail inmates and horse-drawn road graders, he reported that he graded a new road in Martins Creek, graveled the Buffalo Valley Road and Fisk Road, and did a considerable amount of work improving the Buck Mountain and Phifer Mountain Roads. (January 23, 1930) The cookeville Bowling parlor is about to open on West Broad in the new building just completed there by R. S. Greenwood. Alvin Winfree and Joe Miller are to be the operators. They promise it will be up to date and modern in every respect, a place for the enjoyment of women and children as well as men. *Sheriff Marion Warren has appointed a new deputy to replace C. L. Brown, who did recently. The new lawman is W. B. (Brown) Minor, 26, a young married man who is popular around town.

3 He was a salesman at his late father's Swann Hat Co. until recently. His beat is to be west cookeville , says the sheriff. (January 23, 1930: Putnam County Herald, cookeville , TN). Bowling Parlor Opens in West cookeville : A bowling parlor on West Broad Street is the new building owned by R. S. Greenwood, opened last Monday under the management of Tom Walker of McMinnville, and operated by Alvin Winfree and Joe Miller, both of cookeville and experienced in bowling alley operation. The parlor is up-to-date and modern in every respect. It announces that it will be especially open to women who would like to engage in this healthy amusement. It will be known as the cookeville Bowling Parlor. New Telephone System Soon To Be Completed By Gainesboro Co. The new equipment of the Gainesboro Telephone Co., is being installed rapidly under the direction of James Bennett, who is an engineer of the American Electric Co., Chicago, builders of the switchboard, and who is an expert in his line.

4 The new system will be opened in about four weeks unless unforeseen trouble in the hook-up develops. Under the new system the cookeville subscribers will have access to the best telephone service obtainable;. with abundant reserve the telephone company expects to expand its city area which is now within the limit of the plant's capacity, and long distance service will be improved to the extent of the city's needs. The new switchboard embraces the newest and most up-to-date equipment the country has, excepting the dial system. The type is the flashlight signal, ensuring the apex of instant and satisfactory service. *A paper milk bottle has been devised of waxer spruce fibre. The paper milk bottle is used but once. (January 30, 1930) Dr. D. T. Pettross, a popular physician here, is moving to Nashville. He's a chiropractor and has been physician to the football team at Tennessee Polytech here since 1927 in addition to his private practice in Nashville, he'll work with Vanderbilt University's football team.

5 He leaves a number of friends in cookeville , according to the newspaper. (February 6, 1930) The West Side Motor Co. advertises that it has the new Willy Six on its lot, a car that will go an incredible 72 miles per hour. It goes 48 mph in second gear. The car also boasts rich broadcloth upholstery, internal four-wheel brakes, shock absorbers and costs only $850. *Meanwhile, over at Notie's Beauty Parlor, $5 will get you any method of permanent waving you prefer, according to an ad in this week's edition. (February 6, 1930: Putnam County Herald, cookeville , TN): An Interesting Centenarian: Mrs. Betsy Gracey, who resides near Window Cliff, this county, was one hundred and four years old on January 12th. She is the widow of John Gracey, who has been dead for many years, and has lived her long life in the immediate vicinity of her present home. Her maiden name was Robinson, her father being a pioneer settler near the mouth of Falling Water, something near a century ago.

6 Mrs. Gracey is reasonably strong physically and retains her faculties remarkably well. Recently she remarked to her son, Monroe Gracey, aged 56, with whom she lives, that she was 48 years old two weeks before his birth. Her children are all living: Hugh Gracey and Mrs. Illinoise Anderson reside in TX, Jack Gracey is in OK, and Manse Gracey is in NB. Mrs. Lon Green lives near Burton, this county. Truly, a remarkable woman. (February 6, 1930: Putnam County Herald, cookeville , TN): Howell Acquitted On Murder Charge: Orley Howell, 22, was freed by a jury on the charge of murdering his wife, Flossie Lafever Howell last September, in the criminal court last Friday. The jury deliberated some two hours and reported a disagreement, but upon further deliberation returned a verdict of not guilty. Note: Flossie (Lafever) Howell, b. 19 July 1909 d. 15 September 1929, md on the 12th of September 1929, Putnam Co., TN to Orley Howell, b. 6 September 1907, TN d.

7 April 1985, s/o Columbus R. Howell & Adaville Massa. Flossie Lafever Howell, d/o William Thomas Lafever, b. 26 June 1877, White Co., TN d. 20 March 1957, White Co., TN & Oma Ann Mills Lafever, b. 4 August 1882 d. 12. October 1955. William Thomas Lafever is buried in the Lafever Cemetery, Putnam Co., TN. Oma Ann (Mills) Lafever is buried in the Rhea Cemetery, Putnam Co., TN. Flossie (Lafever) Howell, is buried in the Rhea Cemetery, Putnam Co., TN. Oma Ann Mills Lafever was also married to William Mills. (Source: Tennessee State Marriage record, Putnam Co., TN, pg. 24: Orley Howell, age 21, Address: cookeville , TN married 12 September 1929, Putnam Co., TN to Flossie Lafever, age 20, Address: cookeville TN. Name of parent, Guardian or Next of Kin of Female: W. T. Lafever, cookeville , TN). (Thursday, February 13, 1930, Putnam County Herald, cookeville , TN): Bill P. Hensley, a prominent citizen and farmer of the 9th district of Jackson county, died Sunday at his home near Freewill.

8 Funeral services were conducted by Elder Jon. W. Fox of the Church of Christ and burial in the family cemetery Monday, February 10th. He leaves a widow, Mrs. Lizzie Loftis Hensley and several children. Numerous relatives and friends in Jackson and Putnam counties. He was a cousin of Wm. A. Hensley of this city. (February 16, 1930) The county's farm agent suggests farmers consider the advantages of a new cash crop, burley tobacco, and gives away enough free seed to plant 40 acres. State farm officials say burley can be grown without interfering with other crops and with no additional help. An acre of burley tobacco will bring annual farm profit up from $200 to $500 on the average, he says. (Thursday, February 18, 1930, Putnam County Herald, cookeville , TN): Paralysis Fatal To Thomas F. Clouse: Funeral For Prominent Shoe Broker Held Tuesday. Funeral services for Thomas Franklin Clouse, 55, prominent Nashville shoe broker, who died at his residence on the Franklin road, Sunday morning at 1:40 o'clock, following a stroke of paralysis Thursday, was held from the First Presbyterian Church at Nashville, Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock.

9 Dr. James Vance officiating. Mr. Clouse, who is the brother of Wynne F. Clouse, referee in bankruptcy, of Nashville, has been identifield in the shoe industry for the past thirty years, and was recognized as one of the foremost figures in the Southern field. Mr. Clouse was born on the old Clouse estate near cookeville , on October 28, 1874, was the son of Thomas Jefferson and Euneta Clouse. He attended the schools of Putnam County, finishing his high school work at the age of 15. He later went to Quincy City College, Quincy City, IL, taking his degree at the age of 19. While engaged in the shoe industry of Nashville he did all possible for the advancement of his profession, not only in Nashville, but over the entire country. Many of his clientele have built their business along the lines which he advised, it was said. He was widely known for his charity work, and the Christian spirit which was always the keynote of his activity. He was a member of the Free Will Baptist Church, but since moving to Nashville he has made the First Presbyterian Church the place of his worship, where he took an active part in all religious and charitable work.

10 Mr. Clouse had been a member of the Masonic Order since a young man, and all through his life exerted every effort possible to assist in the work of the lodge of which he was a member. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Pearl Ewing Clouse; a son, Ewing Clouse; five brothers, Judge W. F. Clouse of Nashville, J. N. Clouse of Monterey, W. J. Clouse of cookeville , C. S. Clouse of Sparta and R. L. Clouse of Franklin; three sisters, Mrs. Amanda Lee of Monterey, Mrs. S. L. Hudgens of Sparta and Mrs. Mary Troglen of Culver City, CA. Burial took place in the family square in Spring Hill cemetery Tuesday. (February 25, 1930) Tennessee Polytech has broken a state record. Its prize purebred Jersey cow, Flossie, broke the previous state production record recently at the end of a 365-day test period. She churned out 12,145 pounds of milk in the period and pounds of butterfat. *Meanwhile, Putnam Sheriff Marion Warren has been keeping a count of his own.


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