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What is Burnout Syndrome (BOS)? - American Thoracic …

American Thoracic society PUBLIC HEALTH | INFORMATION SERIES. What is Burnout Syndrome (BOS)? First described in the 1970s, BOS is a work-related constellation of symptoms that usually occurs in individuals without any prior history of psychological or psychiatric disorders. BOS. is triggered by a discrepancy between the expectations and ideals of the employee and the actual requirements of their position. In the initial stages of BOS, individuals feel emotional stress and increasing job-related disillusionment. Subsequently, they lose the ability to adapt to the work symptoms of severe BOS, and up to 86% have at least one of environment and display negative attitudes toward their job, the three classic symptoms. When compared to other types of their co-workers, and their patients.

American Thoracic Society PUBLIC HEALTH | INFORMATION SERIES www.thoracic.org work they are expected to complete (weekend and night coverage). Consequences of Burnout Syndrome

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Transcription of What is Burnout Syndrome (BOS)? - American Thoracic …

1 American Thoracic society PUBLIC HEALTH | INFORMATION SERIES. What is Burnout Syndrome (BOS)? First described in the 1970s, BOS is a work-related constellation of symptoms that usually occurs in individuals without any prior history of psychological or psychiatric disorders. BOS. is triggered by a discrepancy between the expectations and ideals of the employee and the actual requirements of their position. In the initial stages of BOS, individuals feel emotional stress and increasing job-related disillusionment. Subsequently, they lose the ability to adapt to the work symptoms of severe BOS, and up to 86% have at least one of environment and display negative attitudes toward their job, the three classic symptoms. When compared to other types of their co-workers, and their patients.

2 Ultimately, three classic nurses, BOS occurs more commonly in critical care nurses. BOS. BOS symptoms develop: exhaustion, depersonalization, and is also common in critical care physicians. Up to 45% of critical reduced personal accomplishment. care physicians reported symptoms of severe BOS. Among 1. Exhaustion: is generalized fatigue that can be related to pediatric critical care physicians the prevalence of BOS is 71%, devoting excessive time and effort to a task or project that is not more than twice the rate in general pediatricians. perceived to be beneficial. For example, a feeling of exhaustion, How to Measure and Detect BOS. particularly emotional exhaustion, may be caused by continuing Burnout Syndrome is most commonly measured with the to care for a patient who has a very poor chance of recovery.

3 Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-HS). The MBI-HS is a 22-item CLIP AND COPY. 2. Depersonalization: is a distant or indifferent attitude self-report questionnaire that consists of three independently towards work. Depersonalization manifests as negative, callous, scored dimensions (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and and cynical behaviors; or interacting with colleagues or patients a lack of personal accomplishment). The questions on the MBI- in an impersonal manner. Depersonalization may be expressed HS classify feelings related to an individual's work environment as unprofessional comments directed toward co-workers, on a 7-point Likert scale. The emotional exhaustion scale includes blaming patients for their medical problems, or the inability to 9 items and identifies individuals who are emotionally exhausted express empathy or grief when a patient dies.

4 Or who feel overextended at work, the depersonalization scale 3. Reduced personal accomplishment is the tendency to includes 5 items and identifies those who have an impersonal negatively evaluate the worth of one's work, feeling insufficient response to patients they are taking care of and the personal in regard to the ability to perform one's job, and a generalized accomplishment scale includes 8 items and assesses a lack of poor professional self-esteem. accomplishment and success related to work. Individuals with BOS may also develop non-specific symptoms Risk factors including feeling frustrated, angry, fearful, or anxious. They Both individual and organizational risk factors are associated may also express an inability to feel happiness, joy, pleasure, with an increased susceptibility to develop BOS.

5 Or contentment. BOS can be associated with physical symptoms including insomnia, muscle tension, headaches, and Individual risk factors: Organizational risk factors: gastrointestinal problems. having poor self-esteem heavy workload maladaptive coping mechanisms conflicts with coworkers Magnitude of the Problem younger adults with an diminished resources Healthcare professionals at the front line of care (family idealistic worldview lack of control or input medicine, emergency medicine, general internal medicine, unrealistically high effort-reward imbalance and critical care) report the highest rates of BOS; in excess expectations understaffing of 40%. Working in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) can be especially stressful due to high patient morbidity and mortality, having financial issues rapid institutional changes challenging daily work routines, and routine encounters with Specific to the critical care environment, risk factors for nurses: traumatic and ethical issues.

6 This level of nearly continuous variability in work schedules stress can rapidly accelerate when caregivers perceive that rapid turnover of patients there is insufficient time or limited resources to properly care for end-of-life events patients. Unfortunately, critical care healthcare professionals have one of the highest rates of BOS. Based upon multiple Critical care physicians share many of the same risk factors as studies, approximately 25-33% of critical care nurses manifest nurses but struggle most with the amount of uninterrupted Am J Respir Crit Care Med Vol. 194, P1-P2, 2016. ATS Public Health Information Series 2016 American Thoracic society American Thoracic society PUBLIC HEALTH | INFORMATION SERIES. work they are expected to complete (weekend and night prevent and treat BOS.)

7 The six standards include: coverage). having skilled communication appropriate staffing Consequences of Burnout Syndrome collaboration meaningful recognition BOS in critical care healthcare professionals may result in effective decision-making authentic leadership post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), alcohol abuse, and even A small randomized controlled trial of resilience training suicidal ideation. PTSD is manifest by intrusion, avoidance, was conducted in ICU nurses. Validated surveys were used negative alterations in cognition and mood, and marked to measure resilience, PTSD, anxiety, depression and alterations in arousal and reactivity. PTSD can occur in response Burnout Syndrome . The intervention arm included a two-day to one catastrophic event or after chronic or repetitive exposure educational workshop, written exposure therapy, mindfulness- to traumatic episodes.

8 Between 22-29% of critical care nurses based stress reduction (MBSR), exercise and event triggered have symptoms of PTSD, and up to 18% of critical care nurses cognitive behavioral therapy sessions. The control arm did not meet the diagnostic criteria for PTSD. have any interventions dictated by the protocol. The results The development of BOS may result in healthcare professionals suggested the intervention was feasible and acceptable. There leaving their profession. Excessive turnover rates increase was also improvement in resilience scores, PTSD symptom healthcare costs, decrease productivity, diminish staff scores and symptoms of depression. Larger randomized morale, and reduce the overall quality of care as experienced controlled trials are needed that are powered to reach professionals who leave the ICU must be replaced.

9 In ICU statistical significance. nurses, turnover occurs frequently with reported annual rates Additional research is needed to identify strategies and ranging between 13-20%: the 2013 average annual turnover interventions that prevent and treat Burnout Syndrome rate for all types of employees was and other psychological disorders such as PTSD, anxiety BOS also results in decreased clinical effectiveness and poor and depression in pulmonary and critical care healthcare work performance that may impact patient care. BOS in professionals. Authors: Meredith Mealer, PhD, Marc Moss, MD.,Vicki Good, Cost of replacing an RN, MSN, CENP, CPPS, David Gozal, MD, MBA, Ruth Kleinpell, ICU nurse is > $65,000 PhD RN FAAN FCCM, Curtis Sessler, MD, FCCP, FCCM.

10 Reviewers: Marianna Sockrider, MD, DrPH, Christopher Slatore, MD, MS. Cost of replacing an ICU physician > $250,000. R Action Steps 1. Understand that there are ways you can manage your work- related stressors that put you at risk for Burnout Syndrome . nurses is associated with lower quality of care, lower patient 2. Engage the support of management, co-workers and friends that may help you cope with stress at work and Burnout satisfaction, increased number of medical errors, increased Syndrome . rates of health-care associated infections, and higher 30-day 3. Take breaks from work. Go outside for a walk or fresh air. mortality rates. There is a strong dose-response and bi- Exercise is known to enhance your physical state and mood. directional relationship between Burnout scores and medical 4.


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