Example: confidence

CRITICAL READIND ACTIVITIES TO DEVELOP …

Scientific literacy and socio scientific issues CRITICAL READIND ACTIVITIES TO DEVELOP CRITICAL . thinking IN SCIENCE CLASSES. Bego a Oliveras1; Conxita M rquez2 and Neus Sanmart 3. 1, 2, 3. Department of Science and Mathematics Education, University Autonoma of Barcelona, Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: The aim of this research is to identify the difficulties experienced by secondary school students (aged 15 to 16) with the CRITICAL reading of newspaper articles with scientific content. Two newspaper CRITICAL reading ACTIVITIES in relation to the study of various scientific contents were designed and carried out in two schools (61 students in total), one with a student population from a medium to high social and economic bracket (school 2) and the other with students from a medium to low social and economic bracket (school 1), and both with different teaching methods. In school 1, the students usually worked in cooperative groups and discussion and self-regulation by students were encouraged.

CRITICAL READIND ACTIVITIES TO DEVELOP CRITICAL THINKING IN SCIENCE CLASSES Begoña Oliveras1; Conxita Márquez2 and Neus Sanmartí3 1, 2, 3 Department of Science and Mathematics Education, University Autonoma of Barcelona,

Tags:

  Critical, Activities, Thinking, Develop, Drained, Critical readind activities to develop, Critical readind activities to develop critical thinking

Information

Domain:

Source:

Link to this page:

Please notify us if you found a problem with this document:

Other abuse

Transcription of CRITICAL READIND ACTIVITIES TO DEVELOP …

1 Scientific literacy and socio scientific issues CRITICAL READIND ACTIVITIES TO DEVELOP CRITICAL . thinking IN SCIENCE CLASSES. Bego a Oliveras1; Conxita M rquez2 and Neus Sanmart 3. 1, 2, 3. Department of Science and Mathematics Education, University Autonoma of Barcelona, Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: The aim of this research is to identify the difficulties experienced by secondary school students (aged 15 to 16) with the CRITICAL reading of newspaper articles with scientific content. Two newspaper CRITICAL reading ACTIVITIES in relation to the study of various scientific contents were designed and carried out in two schools (61 students in total), one with a student population from a medium to high social and economic bracket (school 2) and the other with students from a medium to low social and economic bracket (school 1), and both with different teaching methods. In school 1, the students usually worked in cooperative groups and discussion and self-regulation by students were encouraged.

2 The methodology could be considered to be "student-centred-oriented" according to the classification devised by Kember (1997). In school 2 particular emphasis was placed on reading comprehension and on writing abilities across all areas but, on the other hand, the students never worked in cooperative groups. The teaching was based on the transfer of information by the teacher and the methodology could be considered to "teacher-centred-oriented". The two schools were characterised by the importance placed on experimental work. In order to analyse the difficulties Elements of Science CRITICAL Reading were identified on the basis of the Elements of Reasoning of Paul & Elder (2006) and the categories proposed by Bartz (2002). in his questionnaire and a scale was drawn up. Keywords: CRITICAL thinking , literacy, high schools, abilities and CRITICAL reading. INTRODUCTION. Background and rationale Reading is a fundamental process in science learning since it is not only one of the most often used resources during the school years but can also become a basic tool for ongoing learning throughout life.

3 The media and particularly the written press provide the main sources of scientific information for most adults (Jarman & McClune, 2002). In these media, opinions and actions are often based on scientific knowledge which the reader needs to know how to analyse critically. Reading means understanding, interpreting, analysing and criticising texts. This is the basic meaning of literacy (Norris & Phillips, 2003). CRITICAL reading and, therefore CRITICAL thinking , depend on the context and culture in which they are situated (Yore, Craig & Maguire, 1998). In this research we have focused on assessing CRITICAL thinking abilities based on the proposal by Paul and Elder (2005) and Bartz (2002) in the form of the acronym. Based on these two approaches, we identified certain Elements of science CRITICAL reading that we Page 100. Scientific literacy and socio scientific issues considered useful to guide the CRITICAL reading of newspaper articles with scientific content and also to analyse students' difficulties (see Table 1).

4 Objectives of the research The specific objectives of the research are as follows: 1) To analyse students' difficulties in applying the Elements of science CRITICAL Reading . defined in the reading of press articles. 2) Identify in relation to which Elements of science CRITICAL Reading differences are detected in the two samples analysed (school 1 and school 2). 3) Identify how the content of the readings and the types of questions raised in the ACTIVITIES affect the students' answers. METHODOLOGY. Project description The first phase of the research consisted of selecting two newspaper texts with scientific content. The subject of the first article was the difficulty involved in removing graffiti on glass. According to the author of the new report, graffiti on glass is so difficult to remove because graffiti writers mix acid with the paints they use. This article was chosen so that the students could apply their knowledge of chemical change.

5 Since the information in the text was not completely correct, because acids (apart from hydrofluoric acid) do not react with glass, the students were able to question the scientific basis of the news story. The second article contained opinions for and against whether the swimsuits used by swimmers had helped improve the latest Olympic records. In this case the article was chosen so that the students could apply their knowledge of cynematics and dynamics to the analysis of an actual encourage CRITICAL reading of the articles and reflection, two CRITICAL reading ACTIVITIES were proposed (activity 1_ Grafittis and activity 2_ Swimsuits) which included questions relating to those shown in Table 1. There were other methodological strategies related to cooperational learning and group discussion (M rquez & Prat, 2005; Oliveras, M rquez &. Sanmart , 2011). Elements of Science CRITICAL Reading Examples of question types posed in classroom ACTIVITIES 1.

6 Identify the main ideas of the text -What problem does the text present? What is the main idea? 2. Identify the writer's purpose -Who wrote this document?-Why must he or she have written it? 3. Identify the writer's assumptions and viewpoints - What assumptions does the writer make in the text? Are they justifiable? 4. Formulate a scientific question which the writer -Could an experiment or test be carried out to verify the answers in the article or design a scientific experiment credibility of the main assumption? to verify the information in the text What question would a scientist ask to investigate this problem? 5. Identify data and evidence given in the text -Are there any arguments or scientific evidence in the text that support the initial assumption? Write them down. 6. Draw conclusions based on the evidence -Are the conclusions in line with the current scientific knowledge you have? Page 101. Scientific literacy and socio scientific issues Table 1.

7 Elements of science CRITICAL reading Research population The research was conducted in two secondary schools in Catalonia (Spain). School 1 is situated in Barcelona and its students come from a low social and economic bracket, with 30% of them being immigrants. School 2 is in a town, near Barcelona with a population of 4,000 and its students are from a medium to high social and cultural bracket, with 9% being immigrants. A total of 61 students took part (15 to 16 years of age), 30 in school 1 and 31 in school 2. Data analysis Based on the Elements of CRITICAL reading we defined six categories used to analyse the data collected in this study. Depending on the students' answers, a scale of 1 to 5 was devised. The scale and the classification of the students' answers were validated by two experienced teachers. The average scores in each category between the two schools and the two ACTIVITIES were compared, together with the interaction between them, using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA).

8 All statistical tests were assessed as significant when the p values obtained were less than Codes Categories C1 Identification of the main ideas of the text C2 Identification of the writer's purpose C3 Identification of the writer's assumptions and viewpoints C4 Formulation of a scientific question which the writer answers (article 1) or Design of a scientific experiment to verify the information in the text (article 2). C5 Identification of data and evidence given in the text C6 Arguing conclusions based on evidence Table 2: Codes and Categories . RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. To achieve objective 1 of the research we focused on the means in each category. The results (see Figure 1) show that category 2 (identify the writer's purpose) and category 5 (identify data and evidence given in the text) were those that students found the most difficult overall. Page 102. Scientific literacy and socio scientific issues Mean 4. 3,8. 3,6. 3,4.

9 3,2. 3. 2,8. 2,6. 2,4. 2,2. 2. Cat 1 Cat 2 Cat 3 Cat 4 Cat 5 Cat 6. Fig1. Average scores in each category . In relation to category 2 the results can be explained by the fact that most of the students were convinced that the purpose of the text was to inform and that this information is always neutral and unbiased. Very few students detected that there could be a particular intention in their written work. With respect to category 5, the difficulties detected related to the assumption by the students that a journalist is an informed and qualified person. If, in addition, the text contained a word that they considered to be scientific (acid, floatability, concentration, etc.), they considered this to be a sufficient indicator to support the scientific basis of the news story and, therefore, they saw it as proof of what the writer said. To achieve objective 2 of the research we compared the results of the two schools according to the various categories.

10 The results in Table 3 show that there was a significant difference between them with respect to categories 1, 4 and 6. School 1 School 2 p C1 + + < C2 + + C3 + + C4 + + < C5 + + C6 + +.5 < Table 3. Means plus standard deviation (mean+ SD) for each school (N=61) . Table 3 shows that the results in categories 1 and 4 were better in school 2 in the two ACTIVITIES whereas the results in category 6 were better in school 1 in the two ACTIVITIES . To explain the results we took into account the differences in the teaching methods used at the two schools. In relation to objective 3 of the research the results of the ACTIVITIES carried out were compared according to the various categories (Table 4). Page 103. Scientific literacy and socio scientific issues Activity 1 Activity 2 (Speedo) p (Graffiti). Cat 1 + + Cat 2 + + Cat 3 + + Cat 4 + + < Cat 5 + + < Cat 6 + + Table plus standard deviation (mean+ SD) for each activity (N=61) . The results show that there are significant differences in categories 4 and 5, but not in the rest.


Related search queries