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FAO Aquaculture Newsletter - fao.org

No 58. April 2018. FA N. FAO Aquaculture Newsletter In this month's issue Aquaculture and Trade ii Support Scaling up of Integrated Mangrove- Shrimp Farming for Blue Carbon and Blue Growth in Viet Nam 18. A Strategy for the Sustainable Development of Mediterranean and Black Sea Aquaculture 20. Sharing Innovative, Water-Saving Agri- Aquaculture Experiences Across the Near East and North Africa 28. Working on Increasing Fish Consumption among the Chileans 34. Fish as a Poor People's Food 49. INVITED. EDITORIAL. FAO/L. BIGARR . Packing farmed gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) in an Aquaculture facility in Monastir, Tunisia J. RYDER. Aquaculture and Trade O ver 50 percent of all fish we consume globally is farmed. This has risen from only 28 percent shellfish species were very evident throughout the list, alongside fruits, vegetables, nuts and other amount of farmed fish that enters international trade but it is not unreasonable to assume that in 1995 and the upward trend plant based commodities.

April 2018 N o 58 È Aquaculture and Trade ii È Support Scaling up of Integrated Mangrove-Shrimp Farming for Blue Carbon and Blue Growth in Viet Nam 18

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Transcription of FAO Aquaculture Newsletter - fao.org

1 No 58. April 2018. FA N. FAO Aquaculture Newsletter In this month's issue Aquaculture and Trade ii Support Scaling up of Integrated Mangrove- Shrimp Farming for Blue Carbon and Blue Growth in Viet Nam 18. A Strategy for the Sustainable Development of Mediterranean and Black Sea Aquaculture 20. Sharing Innovative, Water-Saving Agri- Aquaculture Experiences Across the Near East and North Africa 28. Working on Increasing Fish Consumption among the Chileans 34. Fish as a Poor People's Food 49. INVITED. EDITORIAL. FAO/L. BIGARR . Packing farmed gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) in an Aquaculture facility in Monastir, Tunisia J. RYDER. Aquaculture and Trade O ver 50 percent of all fish we consume globally is farmed. This has risen from only 28 percent shellfish species were very evident throughout the list, alongside fruits, vegetables, nuts and other amount of farmed fish that enters international trade but it is not unreasonable to assume that in 1995 and the upward trend plant based commodities.

2 This the levels of farmed fish being will continue as Aquaculture plays reinforces the healthy reputation internationally traded will increase an increasingly important role in that fish generally has in consumers' alongside the production increases. providing fish for global consumers. minds and that positive image of Fish is an important source of fish drives demand, which in turn So what are the issues Aquaculture high quality protein for people drives trade. The request for fish is must address to make the most of worldwide, as well as providing increasing and farmed fish is well this opportunity. Being a farmed important micronutrients and placed to respond to this demand. commodity with control over omega-3 fats. Of course, this does production, Aquaculture products depend on the species and some According to the latest State of benefit from a predictability of recent news about the lower levels World Fisheries and Aquaculture supply, a standardisation of product of omega-3 fatty acids in some (SOFIA, 2016) report, world trade specifications and, likely, more farmed salmon is a concern from in fish and fishery products has stable prices than from capture the perspective of the healthy expanded significantly in recent fisheries.

3 This is very attractive to image that this fish enjoys. But decades for fish destined for buyers. the healthy image persists a human consumption, the quantity recent BBC story, based on peer has risen by more than 500 percent But entering international trade reviewed work, listed the 100 since 1976. However, there are is not without its challenges. In most nutritious foods and fish and no uniform total figures for the general, import tariffs for fish and The designations employed and the presentation of material in this FAO encourages the use, reproduction and dissemination of material information product do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever in this information product. Except where otherwise indicated, material on the part of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations may be copied, downloaded and printed for private study, research and (FAO) concerning the legal or development status of any country, territory, teaching purposes, or for use in non-commercial products or services, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its provided that appropriate acknowledgement of FAO as the source and frontiers or boundaries.

4 The mention of specific companies or products of copyright holder is given and that FAO's endorsement of users' views, manufacturers, whether or not these have been patented, does not imply products or services is not implied in any way. that these have been endorsed or recommended by FAO in preference to others of a similar nature that are not mentioned. All requests for translation and adaptation rights, and for resale and other commercial use rights should be made via: The views expressed in this information product are those of the author(s) or addressed to and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of FAO. FAO information products are available on the FAO website FAO, 2018 ( ) and can be purchased through ii COVER PHOTOS: TOP PHOTO: Floating cage farm in the north of the Red Sea, F. CARDIA MIDDLE LEFT PHOTO: Harvesting barramundi (Lates calcarifer) in a large earthen pond, Saudi Arabia, F. CARDIA MIDDLE RIGHT PHOTO: Harvesting Indian white prawn (Penaeus indicus) in a lined earthen pond, Saudi Arabia, F.

5 CARDIA BOTTOM PHOTO: A floating cage with orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) waiting for the feed, F. CARDIA. INVITED. EDITORIAL. fish products are low in major Coming back to food safety issues, developed importing markets interruption of trade at international understanding of the sector and but import requirements, both borders remains a concern. In its practices. It is therefore crucial regulatory and voluntary, of the this issue of FAN, you will find an to both ensure and communicate major markets are increasing. These analysis of the border control issues the adoption of good practices are not only related to safety and for fish in several major importing that lead to a responsible and quality issues, but also to labelling regions/countries, but suffice it to sustainable Aquaculture sector requirements the EU has strict say that the main problem is the and emphasise the important role labelling laws covering fish and presence of veterinary drugs above that the sector plays in addressing fish products and over the last maximum levels.

6 As well as a food food security, employment and decade the voluntary certification safety issue, this has implications for protection of the environment. If for sustainability issues as well as the development of anti-microbial we do that, Aquaculture will be social and labour conditions in the resistance in micro-organisms, the well placed to meet the increasing supply chain. Fish fraud is the most latter now recognised as one of demand for fish and fish products. recent issue to face the supply chain the main global threats to human and is now a significant concern in health. Improved adoption of good markets around the world, involving Aquaculture practices, including both farmed fish and captured prudent use of veterinary drugs, will fish. Technical solutions exist to help reduce both these problems John Ryder authenticate species species and will help to reinforce a positive Branch Head, Product, Trade and Marketing substitution being the main fraud image of the sector in general.

7 FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture problem, but not the only one Department and as these technologies become Finally, consumer perception plays E-mail: more available, they will become a very important role in buying part of the whole food control behaviour. There is what has been SEE ALSO. system. Companies are already called a perception gap' between using fingerprinting techniques to the way modern Aquaculture FAO. 2016. The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture 2016. protect their brands. is carried out and the public Contributing to food security and nutrition for all. Rome. 200 pp. FAO/J. CAI. Live Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in a seafood market, China FAO Aquaculture Newsletter No. 58 APRIL 2018 iii CONTENTS. Invited Editorial Aquaculture and Trade ii GLOBAL Aquaculture . UPDATES 6. FAO/F. CARDIA. From the Statistician's Desk Notes from the Aquaculture Feeding gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) in a floating cage in the Red Sea Statistician 6. From the Fish Health Regional Evaluation and Dissemination EcoAqua Summer School on Marine Specialist's Desk Workshop of TCP/RAS/3511 Support Spatial Planning 24.

8 Progressive Management Pathway to Pilot Application of Aquaculture Improve Aquaculture Biosecurity Planning and Management Tools in International Symposium on (PMP/AB) 9 Selected ASEAN Member Countries 17 Adaptation of Inland Fisheries and Aquaculture to Climate Change 25. Meetings/events Support Scaling up of Integrated Outcomes of the Ninth Session of the Mangrove-Shrimp Farming for Blue Implementation of Guidelines for Sub-Committee on Aquaculture 12 Carbon and Blue Growth in the Streamlining Aquaculture Authorization Southern Coastal Provinces of and Leasing Processes in the A Seminar on Aquaculture and Viet Nam 18 Mediterranean and the Black Sea 26. Blue Growth Development Opportunities in Small Island Europe Near East and North Africa Developing States 13 A Strategy for the Sustainable Sharing Innovative, Water-Saving Development of Mediterranean and Agri- Aquaculture Experiences Across Black Sea Aquaculture 20 the Near East and North Africa 28. Aquaculture UPDATES.

9 BY REGION 15 The Twenty-Ninth Session of the Outcomes of a Project on Fish Loss European Inland Fisheries and and Waste in Egypt 31. Asia-Pacific Aquaculture Advisory Commission FAO/APFIC Regional Consultation on (EIFAAC) 23 Fourth Edition of the Sub-regional Building Climate Resilient Fisheries Workshop on Aquaculture in the and Aquaculture in Asia-Pacific 15 North African Countries 32. Latin America and the Caribbean High Level Meeting to Launch the Blue Growth Initiative for Latin America and the Caribbean 33. Working on Increasing Fish Consumption among the Chileans - Launching of a National Plan 34. Alternative Low-Cost Fish Feeds to Strengthen the Economic Sustainability of Resource-limited Aquaculture Farmers in Latin America Countries 36. FAO/V. CRESPI. The Construction of a Hatchery with a Production Capacity of 200 000 Fry to Strengthen the Aquaculture Value Women at the fish market of Cap Haitien, Haiti Chain in the North-East of Haiti 37. iv FAO Aquaculture Newsletter No.

10 58 APRIL 2018. CONTENTS. FAO/V. CRESPI. Transfer of farmed gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) in the lagoon of Orbetello, Italy NEW STAFF PROFILES 55. Sub-Saharan Africa NEW PUBLICATIONS 57. A Fish Cage Champion in Kenya 39. Youth Participation in Aquaculture CALENDAR OF EVENTS 62. in Sub-Saharan Africa 41. THEMATIC ARTICLES 44. Border Rejection Trends of Fishery and Aquaculture Products in European Union, United States of America and Japan 44. Aquaculture , the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and FAO's Common Vision for Sustainable Food and Agriculture 47. Fish as a Poor People's Food 49. MISCELLANEOUS 52. Necessary Elements for the Development and Management of Genetic Resources in Aquaculture 52. A User-Friendly Tool for Investment Decision Making in Aquaculture 54. FAO/V. CRESPI. Aquaponics farm producing tilapia fish and strawberries, Oman FAO Aquaculture Newsletter No. 58 APRIL 2018 v GLOBAL. Aquaculture . UPDATES. FAO/F. CARDIA. GLOBAL Aquaculture UPDATES GLOBAL Aquaculture UPDATES GLOBAL Aquaculture UPDATES.


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